Revolutionizing FMCG Procurement and Compliance

A New Era of Efficiency, Transparency, and Sustainability

by Michelle Armstrong, TYS Global VP of Value Solutions Consultant

Unlock Efficiency, Transparency, and Trust
In the fast-paced world of Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG), procurement and compliance teams face unique challenges. From ensuring a steady flow of quality supplies to adhering to stringent regulatory standards, the demands are relentless. That’s where Trust Your Supplier (TYS) comes into play, offering an innovative solution that transforms the way FMCG companies manage their supplier relationships. 

Why Trust Your Supplier? 

  1. Enhanced Transparency and Trust
    Trust Your Supplier provides a comprehensive digital passport for suppliers, offering real-time insights into their operations, compliance status, and more. This transparency fosters trust between FMCG companies and their suppliers, ensuring that procurement decisions are based on accurate and up-to-date information. 
  1. Streamlined Supplier Onboarding and Management
    Gone are the days of cumbersome onboarding processes. TYS simplifies and accelerates supplier integration, allowing FMCG companies to quickly benefit from their services. With TYS, managing supplier information becomes effortless, enabling procurement teams to focus on strategic decision-making rather than administrative tasks. 
  1. Risk Management and Compliance Assurance
    In the FMCG sector, ensuring compliance with regulatory standards is paramount. Trust Your Supplier not only facilitates easy access to supplier compliance documentation but also provides tools for monitoring and managing risk. This proactive approach to compliance helps FMCG companies avoid costly penalties and reputational damage. 
  1. Improved Operational Efficiency
    By automating key procurement processes, TYS significantly reduces manual workload, leading to improved efficiency and cost savings. Procurement and compliance teams can allocate their resources more effectively, optimizing their supply chain operations. 
  1. Building Sustainable Supply Chains
    Sustainability is a pressing concern in the FMCG industry. Trust Your Supplier supports the development of sustainable supply chains by enabling companies to identify and collaborate with suppliers that adhere to environmental and social standards. This alignment with corporate sustainability goals not only benefits the planet but also enhances brand reputation. 

The Future of FMCG Procurement and Compliance
In an industry where speed, quality, and compliance cannot be compromised, Trust Your Supplier stands out as a beacon of innovation. By leveraging blockchain technology and a network of trusted information, TYS is redefining what’s possible in FMCG procurement and compliance. 

Join the Revolution
For FMCG procurement and compliance teams looking to enhance their operations, reduce risk, and build stronger, more sustainable supplier relationships, the choice is clear. Trust Your Supplier is not just a platform; it’s a strategic partner in your supply chain transformation journey. 

Discover how Trust Your Supplier can revolutionize your procurement and compliance strategies. Contact us today to learn more or to schedule a demo. 

Trust Your Supplier’s Michelle Armstrong Featured in CIO Business World

Exciting News! Trust Your Supplier (TYS) is proud to announce that Michelle Armstrong, our Global VP of Value Engineering, has been featured in CIO Business World for her insightful article on Scope 3 emissions!

Scope 3 emissions, a critical aspect of greenhouse gas accounting, pose unique challenges for organizations. Michelle explores key factors such as voluntary vs. mandatory reporting, standards and protocols, and the growing pressure from investors and stakeholders to address these emissions.

Check out the full blog to gain insights into:
Voluntary vs. Mandatory Reporting
Standards and Protocols
Investor and Stakeholder Pressure
Sector-Specific Guidelines
Local and National Regulations
Integration with Broader ESG Goals

 

Material Sourcing: The Ethical Heartbeat of Super Bowl Rings

by April Harrison, TYS Marketing Director

While the specific details of the sourcing practices for Super Bowl rings may not be publicly disclosed or standardized across all teams, in recent years, there has been a growing trend in various industries, including jewelry and luxury goods, towards ethical and responsible sourcing of materials. 

Many organizations and consumers place increasing importance on sustainability, ethical mining, and fair labor practices. Various certifications, such as the Kimberley Process for diamonds, aim to prevent the trade of conflict diamonds. Additionally, some jewelry companies and manufacturers commit to using recycled metals and responsibly sourced gemstones. 

Here’s what a Super Bowl ring creation process looks like when the journey truly begins with a commitment to ethical and responsible material sourcing.  

1️⃣ Gold and Platinum Elegance: The materials at the core of these coveted rings are often gold and platinum. The quest for perfection starts with the careful selection of these precious metals. Responsible mining practices and the traceability of the metal’s origin are paramount. This ensures that the journey from the earth to the ring is marked by environmental sensitivity and ethical labor practices.  

2️⃣ Diamonds and Gemstones with a Conscience: Adding sparkle to the equation, diamonds and gemstones are chosen with meticulous attention. The focus extends beyond their brilliance to the ethical mining and sourcing of these gems. Conflict-free diamonds, adhering to the Kimberley Process, and responsibly sourced gemstones underscore the commitment to a supply chain free from ethical concerns.  

3️⃣ Sustainable Practices: The commitment to sustainability doesn’t end with responsible sourcing. Efforts are made to reduce the environmental footprint throughout the production process. From using recycled metals to implementing energy-efficient manufacturing techniques, the goal is to create a tangible symbol of victory without compromising the planet’s well-being.   

4️⃣ Community Impact: Beyond environmental considerations, ethical material sourcing extends to the impact on local communities. Partnerships with communities near mining sites contribute to social development initiatives, ensuring that the journey of creating these rings leaves a positive footprint on the lives of those involved. 

5️⃣ Transparency and Certification: To instill confidence in the authenticity and ethical standards of the materials, Super Bowl rings often come with certifications. These certifications not only vouch for quality but also affirm the commitment to responsible and ethical practices, allowing wearers to proudly showcase their rings with a clear conscience.  

To determine the exact ethical sourcing practices of Super Bowl rings, you would need to check with the specific teams, manufacturers, or organizations involved in their creation. For any organization, becoming more transparent about their supply chain shows commitment to ethical and sustainable practices. To amplify the impact, collaboration with emerging technology providers like Trust Your Supplier, equipped with compliance and risk management features, ensures a supply chain in harmony with regulatory requirements and industry benchmarks. 

When responsibly sourced, these Super Bowl rings become more than mere symbols of victory; they transform into emblems of ethical origins and meaningful community contributions, resonating far beyond the boundaries of the football field. 🏈💎🌍 

 #EthicalSourcing #SuperBowl #SustainableSourcing #ethicalmining #fairlabor #ConflictFreeDiamonds #KimberleyProcess #Compliance #SupplyChain

 

A Second Chance at Glory: Turning Defeat into Compassion and Inspiration

by April Harrison, TYS Marketing Director

Continuing my exploration of the Super Bowl supply chain, what becomes of the championship shirts and hats for the losing team? These brand-new garments, seemingly destined for obscurity, lead into the next part of our series, A Second Chance at Glory: Turning Defeat into Compassion and Inspiration.

In a heartwarming twist of fate, the losing team’s championship gear transforms from a symbol of defeat into an extraordinary opportunity for compassion and inspiration. Here’s how this second chance at glory unfolds:  

Upon the conclusion of the Super Bowl, humanitarian organizations and charitable foundations swiftly step into action. Partnering with the league or the sports apparel companies responsible for manufacturing the gear, these organizations see beyond the game’s outcome and recognize the transformative potential of these items. The losing team’s championship gear embarks on a new journey, transcending borders to reach communities facing hardships around the world. Whether it’s in regions affected by natural disasters, impoverished areas, or communities dealing with various challenges, the gear becomes a beacon of support and inspiration.   

Distributed by these humanitarian organizations, the gear takes on a new purpose: to empower and uplift. T-shirts and hats that once symbolized a moment of disappointment now become symbols of resilience and shared humanity. The recipients, often facing adversity, find warmth and encouragement in the unexpected gift, fostering a sense of community and connection. Each piece of championship gear carries with it the stories of determination, teamwork, and sportsmanship that define the Super Bowl. These narratives resonate with individuals who receive the gear, reminding them that, even in the face of setbacks, there is a shared human spirit that unites us all.  

While it’s uplifting to see these garments finding a meaningful second purpose, authentic corporate responsibility begins by ensuring that every procurement decision resonates with a commitment to ethics and sustainability. Visibility into a company’s supplier base is crucial and Trust Your Supplier’s integration with strategic partners, such as EcoVadis, Verisk Maplecroft, Dunn and Bradstreet, and Moody’s Analytics, brings together all the necessary components for procurement organizations that are on the path toward ethical sourcing. In this way, these garments will make an impact on both ends of their life—beginning with sustainable sourcing and concluding with a profound social impact. 

#ethicalsourcing #socialimpact #superbowl #supplychain #sustainableprocurement

Feast and Footprint: Unveiling the Culinary Extravaganza and Waste at the Super Bowl!

by April Harrison, TYS Marketing Director

As the Super Bowl spectacle unfolds on the field, another grand performance is taking place in the stands and concession areas—a culinary masterpiece of epic proportions. Let’s delve into the food consumed and the waste generated during this colossal event.

Super Bowl Sunday is not just a showdown of athletic prowess; it’s a gastronomic celebration. Millions of fans in the stadium and watching at home indulge in a culinary feast, devouring an astonishing array of food ranging from classic hot dogs and nachos to gourmet treats and stadium specialties. The sheer scale of the Super Bowl translates to mind-boggling food consumption. Think thousands of pizzas, millions of chicken wings, and enough nachos to build a culinary fortress.   

Yet, behind the scenes of this culinary symphony lies a challenge—food waste. The sheer volume of meals served, and snacks consumed contributes to a significant amount of waste, including packaging, uneaten portions, and disposable utensils. The challenge is not only to satiate the appetites of millions but also to do so responsibly, minimizing the environmental impact.  

In recent years, there’s been a growing awareness of the environmental footprint of major events like the Super Bowl. Stadiums, vendors, and organizers are increasingly adopting sustainable practices, from sourcing compostable utensils to implementing recycling programs. These efforts aim to strike a balance between the grandeur of the occasion and the responsibility to our planet.  

Fans, too, play a crucial role. The Super Bowl experience extends beyond the field, and conscious choices by attendees—like using designated recycling bins and opting for eco-friendly alternatives—contribute to the overall sustainability narrative.  

The need for conscientious choices echoes far beyond the stadium, reaching into the core of procurement organizations. Trust Your Supplier (TYS), as a pioneer in SaaS blockchain networks, offers invaluable tools and insights for procurement organizations of any size to navigate the labyrinth of ethical choices. By leveraging TYS’s platform, we empower these organizations to make sustainable choices, ensuring that every procurement decision contributes to a dedicated commitment to our planet’s well-being. 

#SuperBowlFeast #SustainableCelebration #EnvironmentalConsciousness #Procurement #Sustainability #ESG

GHG Protocol Decoded: Tech Solutions for Scope 3 Reporting

by Michelle Armstrong, TYS Global VP of Value Solutions Consultant

 

Scope 3 emissions, often referred to as “value chain emissions,” are a part of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol’s corporate standard for greenhouse gas accounting. These emissions are generally the most significant share of an organization’s carbon footprint but are also the most complex to manage and mitigate, as they involve activities not directly owned or controlled by the reporting company. Scope 3 includes both upstream and downstream emissions and encompasses a wide range of indirect emissions sources.

The regulations and guidelines around Scope 3 emissions vary depending on the region and the specific regulatory framework. However, there are some general aspects to consider:

  • Voluntary vs. Mandatory Reporting: In many regions, reporting Scope 3 emissions is still voluntary but is increasingly being encouraged or required as part of broader sustainability reporting frameworks. For example, the European Union’s Non-Financial Reporting Directive (NFRD) encourages companies to report on their Scope 3 emissions.
  • Standards and Protocols: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol provides the most widely used international accounting tool for government and business leaders to understand, quantify, and manage greenhouse gas emissions, including Scope 3.
  • Corporate Sustainability Reporting: Companies may choose to report Scope 3 emissions as part of their sustainability or corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting. This is often done to improve transparency, manage risks, and identify opportunities for reducing emissions in the supply chain.
  • Investor and Stakeholder Pressure: There is increasing pressure from investors, customers, and other stakeholders for companies to report and reduce their Scope 3 emissions. This pressure often drives more detailed and rigorous reporting and reduction strategies.
  • Sector-Specific Guidelines: Certain industries have specific guidelines or expectations for Scope 3 reporting. For example, the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) provides methods and guidance for companies to set science-based targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, including Scope 3.
  • Local and National Regulations: Some countries have specific regulations or guidelines for Scope 3 reporting. These can vary significantly and may be more or less stringent than international standards.
  • Integration with Broader ESG Goals: Scope 3 emissions reporting is often part of broader environmental, social, and governance (ESG) strategies and goals within organizations.

Technological Approaches for Measuring Scope 3 Emissions

Measuring Scope 3 emissions involves complex data collection and analysis due to the broad range of indirect emission sources across a company’s value chain. Technology plays a crucial role in this process, with several key approaches:

  • Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Tools: These software tools analyze the environmental impacts of products or services throughout their entire life cycle, from raw material extraction to disposal. LCA tools can be instrumental in quantifying Scope 3 emissions related to product use and end-of-life stages.
  • Supply Chain Analysis Software: These platforms focus on mapping and assessing emissions within a company’s supply chain. They help identify hotspots of high emissions and opportunities for reduction by analyzing supplier data and activities.
  • Carbon Accounting Platforms: These comprehensive tools enable companies to track and manage their carbon emissions across all scopes, including Scope 3. They often feature dashboards, reporting capabilities, and scenario analysis to support strategic decision-making.
  • Energy Management Systems (EMS): While primarily focused on direct energy consumption (Scope 1 and 2), EMS can also contribute to Scope 3 analysis by providing insights into the energy use and associated emissions of leased assets, franchises, and outsourced activities.
  • Blockchain and IoT: Emerging technologies like blockchain and the Internet of Things (IoT) offer new ways to track and verify emissions data across complex supply chains, enhancing transparency and accuracy.

Data Sources for Scope 3 Emissions Measurement

Scope 3 reporting platforms gather data from a variety of sources:

  • Supplier Surveys and Self-Reporting: Direct communication with suppliers to collect data on their emissions and environmental practices.
  • Industry Averages and Benchmarks: Utilizing established databases and benchmarks to estimate emissions for common processes or products in the absence of specific data.
  • Public and Proprietary Databases: Accessing government or commercial databases that provide emissions factors and environmental impact data for a wide range of activities and materials.
  • Sensor and IoT Data: Collecting real-time data from sensors and IoT devices embedded in products or supply chain operations to monitor emissions.

Reliability and Approaches

The reliability of Scope 3 measurement can vary significantly based on the data quality, the methodologies used, and the comprehensiveness of the analysis. Approaches that incorporate primary data from direct suppliers and use robust, widely recognized methodologies (like those recommended by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol) tend to be more reliable. However, even with the best tools and intentions, Scope 3 measurements often involve a degree of estimation and uncertainty, especially when relying on secondary data or industry averages.

Watch-Outs When Sourcing Scope 3 Reporting Software

  • Data Quality and Transparency: Ensure the software supports high-quality, verifiable data collection and offers transparency about its methodologies and data sources.
  • Customization and Scalability: The platform should be adaptable to your specific industry and supply chain complexity and scalable as your business and reporting needs evolve.
  • Integration with Existing Systems: The software should integrate seamlessly with your existing ERP, CRM, and other management systems to streamline data flow and avoid silos.
  • Compliance and Standards Alignment: Verify that the software supports compliance with relevant regional regulations and aligns with international standards like the Greenhouse Gas Protocol.
  • User Support and Training: Adequate user support, training, and resources are essential to ensure the successful implementation and ongoing use of the platform.

In conclusion, technology offers powerful tools for measuring Scope 3 emissions, but the choice of platform and approach requires careful consideration of your company’s specific needs, the quality and source of the data used, and the ability to integrate and align with broader sustainability goals

International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB)

by Michelle Armstrong, TYS Global VP of Value Solutions Consultant

Complying with the global standards set by the International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) involves aligning your business’s sustainability reporting with internationally recognized guidelines. The ISSB, operating under the IFRS Foundation, aims to provide a global baseline of high-quality sustainability disclosure standards to meet investors’ information needs. Here’s a guide for your business to align with the ISSB standards: 

Understand the ISSB Standards and Their Objectives

  • Overview of ISSB Standards: Familiarize yourself with the ISSB’s aim to standardize sustainability disclosures, focusing on providing relevant, reliable, and comparable information to investors. 
  • Scope and Relevance: Understand how these standards are relevant to your business, particularly in communicating sustainability-related financial risks and opportunities to investors. 

Assess Current Sustainability Reporting Practices

  • Gap Analysis: Evaluate your current sustainability reporting practices against the ISSB standards to identify gaps. 
  • Stakeholder Engagement: Engage with key stakeholders, including investors, to understand their needs and expectations regarding sustainability information. 

Integrate Sustainability into Governance

  • Governance Structure: Ensure your board and management are equipped to oversee sustainability issues in line with the ISSB standards. 
  • Accountability and Responsibility: Assign clear roles and responsibilities for sustainability reporting and disclosure within your organization. 

Enhance Data Collection and Management

  • Robust Data Systems: Develop or enhance systems to collect accurate and verifiable sustainability data. 
  • Quality and Consistency: Focus on the quality, consistency, and reliability of the data collected for sustainability reporting. 

Align Reporting with ISSB Requirements

  • Disclosure Practices: Adapt your sustainability reporting practices to align with the ISSB’s disclosure requirements, focusing on materiality, clarity, and completeness. 
  • Continuous Improvement: Regularly review and update your reporting practices to align with evolving ISSB standards and best practices. 

Prepare for External Assurance

  • Assurance Readiness: Prepare for external assurance of your sustainability disclosures to ensure they meet the ISSB standards. 
  • Transparency and Credibility: Use external assurance to enhance the credibility and transparency of your sustainability reporting. 

Implement Effective Communication Strategies

  • Investor Communication: Develop a strategy to effectively communicate your sustainability performance and risks to investors. 
  • Public Reporting: Ensure public disclosures are clear, concise, and provide meaningful information to investors and other stakeholders. 

Monitor Developments and Participate in Dialogues

  • Stay Informed: Keep abreast of developments and updates in ISSB standards and related regulatory changes. 
  • Industry Collaboration: Participate in industry forums and dialogues to stay informed and influence the development of sustainability standards. 

Train and Educate Staff

  • Internal Training: Provide training for staff involved in sustainability reporting to ensure understanding and compliance with ISSB standards. 
  • Building Expertise: Develop internal expertise or seek external support for interpreting and applying the ISSB standards. 

Conclusion
Aligning with the ISSB standards is a strategic move towards globally consistent and comparable sustainability reporting. It not only aids in meeting investor demands but also enhances the overall credibility and transparency of your business’s sustainability efforts. As these standards evolve, staying proactive in adapting and improving your sustainability reporting practices will be key to maintaining alignment and demonstrating your commitment to sustainable business practices. 

Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD)

by Michelle Armstrong, TYS Global VP of Value Solutions Consultant

Complying with the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) involves a strategic approach to climate-related risk management and disclosure. The TCFD aims to improve and increase the reporting of climate-related financial information. Here’s a comprehensive guide for your business to align with the TCFD recommendations: 

Understand the TCFD Framework

  • Framework Overview: Familiarize yourself with the TCFD’s four core areas: Governance, Strategy, Risk Management, and Metrics and Targets. 
  • Applicability and Benefits: Understand how the TCFD recommendations apply to your organization and the benefits of enhanced climate-related financial disclosures, including better risk management and more informed strategic planning. 

Integrate Climate-Related Risks into Governance

  • Board Oversight: Ensure your board of directors is informed about and oversees climate-related risks and opportunities. 
  • Management’s Role: Establish management-level roles responsible for assessing and managing climate-related issues. 

Incorporate Climate Change into Organizational Strategy

  • Impact Assessment: Assess the potential impact of climate-related risks and opportunities on your organization’s businesses, strategy, and financial planning. 
  • Scenario Analysis: Conduct scenario analysis to understand the resilience of your organization’s strategy under different climate-related scenarios. 

Manage Climate-Related Risks

  • Risk Identification and Assessment: Identify and assess climate-related risks to determine how they could affect your organization. 
  • Risk Management Processes: Integrate climate-related risks into your existing risk management processes, ensuring an organization-wide approach to addressing these risks. 

Develop and Disclose Climate-Related Metrics and Targets

  • Metrics Selection: Choose appropriate climate-related metrics that are relevant to your organization. 
  • Setting Targets: Set and disclose targets your organization uses to manage climate-related risks and explain how these targets align with your strategy. 

Enhance Transparency and Disclosure

  • Reporting: Prepare to disclose climate-related financial information in your organization’s annual financial filings or other public documents. 
  • Continuous Improvement: Regularly update and refine your disclosures as practices and knowledge evolve. 

Engage with Stakeholders

  • Stakeholder Communication: Communicate with stakeholders about your organization’s approach to managing climate-related risks and opportunities. 
  • Feedback Incorporation: Use stakeholder feedback to enhance your climate-related financial disclosures. 

Monitor Regulatory Developments

  • Regulatory Awareness: Stay informed about current and upcoming regulations related to climate disclosure in the jurisdictions where your organization operates. 
  • Compliance Preparation: Prepare your organization for potential regulatory changes or requirements related to climate reporting. 

Provide Training and Build Capacity

  • Internal Training: Ensure relevant employees and management are trained on the importance of climate-related risks and the TCFD recommendations. 
  • Expertise Development: Develop in-house expertise or seek external support to understand and implement TCFD-aligned disclosures effectively. 

Conclusion
Aligning with the TCFD recommendations is essential for forward-thinking organizations committed to addressing climate change risks and opportunities. It facilitates compliance with emerging regulations and positions your business as a leader in sustainable practices, enhancing investor confidence and public trust. By taking proactive steps in governance, strategy, risk management, and transparent reporting, your organization can effectively navigate the challenges and opportunities posed by climate change. 

Complying with the EU Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD)

by Michelle Armstrong, TYS Global VP of Value Solutions Consultant

Complying with the EU Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD)involves several key steps and considerations for businesses. The CSRD significantly expands the sustainability reporting requirements for companies in the EU. Here’s a guide to what your business needs to do: 

 Understand the Scope and Applicability

  • Determine Eligibility: The CSRD applies to all large companies, whether they are publicly listed or not. Specifically, it targets companies with more than 500 employees. 
  • Timeline Awareness: Be aware of when the CSRD requirements will apply to your business. The directive is expected to be applied in stages starting from 2024 for reports published in 2025. 

 Develop Robust Data Collection Systems

  • Data Collection and Management: Establish or enhance systems for collecting a wide range of ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance) data. This includes environmental impact, social practices, and governance structures. 
  • Technology Integration: Consider implementing technology solutions that can help in accurately collecting and managing sustainability data.

Align Reporting with CSRD Requirements

  • Understand Reporting Criteria: Familiarize yourself with the specific reporting standards and formats that the CSRD mandates. This includes details on sustainability-related matters such as environmental protection, social responsibility, and treatment of employees. 
  • External Standards and Frameworks: Align your reporting with recognized sustainability frameworks and standards that are consistent with CSRD requirements. 

Integrate Sustainability into Business Strategy

  • Strategic Alignment: Ensure that your company’s strategy reflects a commitment to sustainability, as the CSRD aims for sustainability to be integrated into the business model. 
  • Stakeholder Engagement: Engage with stakeholders, including employees, customers, and suppliers, to understand their perspectives and incorporate their feedback into your sustainability practices. 

Establish a Sustainability Governance Structure

  • Governance Framework: Set up a governance framework for sustainability reporting, ensuring that there is oversight and accountability within the organization. 
  • Training and Awareness: Train relevant staff on CSRD requirements and the importance of sustainability reporting. 

Prepare for Assurance and Verification

  • Assurance Readiness: Prepare for external assurance of your sustainability reporting, as the CSRD requires assurance on the reported sustainability information. 
  • Transparency and Accountability: Focus on the accuracy and transparency of your reporting to build trust with stakeholders and comply with the directive. 

Stay Informed and Adapt

  • Regulatory Updates: Stay updated on any changes or updates to the CSRD and related regulations. 
  • Continuous Improvement: Regularly review and update your sustainability practices and reporting to ensure ongoing compliance and improvement. 

Communicate and Disclose

  • Effective Communication: Develop a communication plan to effectively disclose sustainability information both internally and externally. 
  • Report Preparation: Prepare your sustainability reports in line with CSRD guidelines and ensure they are accessible to stakeholders. 

Conclusion
Compliance with the CSRD is not just a regulatory requirement; it’s an opportunity to embed sustainability into the core of your business operations. By taking these steps, businesses can not only comply with the directive but also demonstrate their commitment to sustainable development and corporate responsibility. 

Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive (CSDDD)

by Michelle Armstrong, TYS Global VP of Value Solutions Consultant

Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive (CSDDD) requires a comprehensive approach from businesses. The CSDDD aims to ensure that companies operating in the EU market address and mitigate adverse impacts on human rights and the environment within their operations and supply chains. Here’s a guide on what your business needs to do: 

Understand the Directive and Its Scope

  • Determine Applicability: The CSDDD applies to large companies operating in the EU market. This includes EU companies with significant turnover and a certain number of employees, as well as non-EU companies with substantial business in the EU. 
  • Scope of Operations: Understand that the directive covers your operations, your subsidiaries, and your supply chain, including indirect business relationships.

Conduct Thorough Due Diligence

  • Risk Assessment: Carry out a thorough risk assessment to identify actual and potential adverse impacts on human rights and the environment in your operations and supply chains. 
  • Action Plan: Develop and implement an action plan to address, prevent, and mitigate identified risks. 

Engage with Affected Stakeholders

  • Stakeholder Engagement: Actively engage with potentially affected groups, including workers, local communities, and other relevant stakeholders, to understand their concerns and perspectives. 
  • Feedback Mechanisms: Establish and maintain a system for receiving and addressing feedback or complaints from affected stakeholders. 

Implement Effective Governance Structures

  • Responsibility and Oversight: Assign responsibility for due diligence at a high governance level within your organization. 
  • Training and Awareness: Ensure employees and management are trained and aware of the due diligence requirements. 

Ensure Transparency and Reporting

  • Public Reporting: Prepare and publicly disclose an annual report on your due diligence policies, processes, findings, and actions taken. 
  • Transparent Communication: Be transparent about the challenges and limitations faced in addressing adverse impacts. 

Monitor, Evaluate, and Update Due Diligence Practices

  • Continuous Monitoring: Regularly monitor the effectiveness of your due diligence measures. 
  • Regular Updates: Update your due diligence processes as needed based on monitoring results and evolving risks. 

Prepare for Legal Compliance and Liability

  • Legal Compliance: Understand and comply with the legal obligations under the CSDDD, including civil liability provisions. 
  • Documenting Compliance: Keep thorough records of your due diligence efforts to demonstrate compliance. 

Establish End-to-End Supply Chain Management

  • Supply Chain Collaboration: Work collaboratively with suppliers and business partners to ensure they understand and comply with the CSDDD requirements. 
  • Contractual Clauses: Include appropriate clauses in contracts with suppliers and business partners to ensure compliance with due diligence obligations. 

Develop a Responsive Strategy for Identified Risks

  • Mitigation and Remediation: Develop strategies to mitigate any adverse impacts and provide for remediation where harm has occurred. 
  • Ending Relationships: Be prepared to end business relationships if mitigation of adverse impacts is not possible. 

Conclusion
Compliance with the CSDDD is a crucial step towards responsible and sustainable business practices. By integrating due diligence into your business operations and addressing potential adverse impacts on human rights and the environment, your company not only adheres to regulatory requirements but also contributes positively to societal and environmental well-being.